Juan Ormaza


Juan Ormaza was born in Quito, Ecuador. He lives and works in Boston and Quito. He received her BFA from the Escuela Nacional de Artes “La Esmeralda” in Mexico and MFA from Alfred University, in Alfred NY.

His paintings, drawings, sculptures and videos have been exhibited in both solo and group shows in the United States, Ecuador and Mexico. He participates in the VIII International Biennale of Cuenca, Ecuador.

Ormaza describe his work to be driven by intellectual curiosity and an internal necessity to see art as a form of subjective dissent. In the last 13 years his work has been based on information about physical and emotional destruction afflicted on innocent people in zones of military conflict. Through this work, Ormaza describes, I am creating a personal narrative, not as an illustration of events but as a fictional weaving – a way to tell stories that provide emotional experiences to the viewer. I want to identify what make us equal, what make us feel the same and what make us dream together. I want to stimulate a dialogue that takes place more through a sensory experience than the frame of reason.

 

“When crimes begin to pile up they become invisible. When sufferings become unendurable the cries are no longer heard. The cries, too, fall like rain in summer.”

Bertolt Brecht

My work is driven by intellectual curiosity and an internal necessity to see art as a form of subjective dissent. Chronicles is an ongoing series begun in 2002. The work presented in this exhibition is based on information about the physical and emotional destruction afflicted on innocent people in war zones in the last 13 years. I am creating a personal narrative not as an illustration of events, but as a fictional weaving; a way to tell stories providing emotional experiences to the viewer. I want to identify what makes us equal, what make us feel the same, what make us dream together. I want to stimulate a dialog that will takes place more through a sensitive experience than in the frame of reason. The work is stimulated by Kathe Kollwitz work. I ask myself, where are the children and the mothers in these wars? I remember Leon Golub and his series of paintings and drawings, Interrogations and Goya and his illustrations on the moral dilemmas of war. We know there are new Guernicas today.